Thursday, 17 March 2016

Heating and cooling loads in Hospitals



Heating and cooling loads in Hospitals


RABScreen Energy Calculations
kW Cooling
kW Input
Hours pa
kWh
Per kWh
Clean coil
Dirty coil
Extra
10
3.13
4380
   13,730
0.12
         1,648
       2,142
       494
20
6.27
4380
   27,461
0.12
         3,295
       4,284
       989
30
9.40
4380
   41,191
0.12
         4,943
       6,426
    1,483
40
12.54
4380
   54,922
0.12
         6,591
       8,568
    1,977
50
15.67
4380
   68,652
0.12
         8,238
     10,710
    2,471
75
23.51
4380
 102,978
0.12
       12,357
     16,065
    3,707
100
31.35
4380
 137,304
0.12
       16,476
     21,419
    4,943
200
62.70
4380
 274,608
0.12
       32,953
     42,839
    9,886

Hospitals have specific heating and cooling requirements because they are occupied 24 hours per day and 7 days per week for the whole year.

There is a need for hot water to maintain hygiene and kitchen facilities. Many hospitals are heated to higher temperatures than other buildings but incorporate a higher frequency of air changes within the HVAC system.

NHS Estates will generate 18m tonnes of carbon and CO2 each year. This is 30% of the public sector carbon footprint and more than 20% of this is caused by the energy used to light, heat and cool its buildings.

The Design and Delivery of Robust Hospital Environments (De2RHECC) research project is an EPSRC-funded collaborative project involving four universities and four NHS Hospital Trusts.  This project investigates economic and practical strategies for the NHS infrastructure to increase its resilience to climate change whilst continuing to meet its service goals and energy performance requirements”.

Cambridge University Professor of Architecture Alan Short said in a radio interview in July 2014 that

“Probably by the mid-twenty forties in the south of England the NHS will have a huge air-conditioning bill, unless it does some very simple adaptation schemes to its existing buildings”.

The following statements have been made over recent years concerning the impact of dirty coils on heating and cooling loads. 



·         For each 1°Celsius rise in discharge temp there is a 1.75% increase in power consumption and a 1.1% decrease in cooling capacity - HVAC Insider

·         According to EPA research 1mm of dirt on an A/C coil can reduce efficiency by 21% - Contracting Business

·         A/C Equipment operating with dirty coils can use as much as 37% more energy than equipment with clean coils - Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News & RSES Journal

·         A 10 Ton A/C system now only provides 7 tons of cooling! Costing more to operate, providing less cooling - Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News & RSES Journal

·         A dirty system runs 80% of the time fighting dirt, when it should operate at 30% during mild weather - Contracting Business Magazine

·         Dirty Condensers restrict heat transfer, causing the compressor to work harder – rising head pressure results in a loss of cooling capacity of up to 30% - Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News

This is why the new RABScreen is proving a cost effective solution for anyone moving air and could be a massive low cost energy saver for the NHS Estates. 



For a free, no obligation survey contact RAB on 01635 248633, info@rabscreen.com or via our website www.rabscreen.com









1 comment:

  1. You're absolutely right about that. My old air conditioner was very loud and not efficient at all. It was a hole in my pocket due to that. But this guys http://myairmatics.com helped me to figure that out. I very appreciate that and recommend to us their services.

    ReplyDelete